Theme:

While the region has made progress in addressing systemic issues of race, at the county level, the National Segregation Dissimilarity Index indicates that certain areas of Northeast Ohio remain highly segregated.

Residency of Northeast Ohio’s Minority Communities

Northeast Ohio Racial Minorities

As a region, Northeast Ohio is roughly 4/5 white and 1/5 minority.

The Cleveland Housing Market has the largest non-white population of 25.9%. The Ashtabula and Wooster housing markets have the highest percentage White population at over 92%. The Cleveland housing market has the highest concentration of African-American (20.1%) and Hispanic/Latino (4.7%) residents. Cleveland and Akron are the only two housing markets with an Asian population above 0.8%.

Percentage of Minority Residents in Northeast Ohio

Residency of Northeast Ohio’s African-American Population

Northeast Ohio’s African-American population is highly concentrated in specific neighborhoods within the central cities and inner-ring suburbs. The Cleveland housing market has the highest concentration of African-American residents at 20.1%.

Segregation

The Racial Dissimilarity Index compares areas by race based on a scale of 1 to 100, where perfect integration = 0 and complete segregation = 100. A score of 53 or more is considered a high level of segregation; areas with low levels of segregation score below 40.

In five counties in Northeast Ohio, African-American residents experience a high level of segregation – Cuyahoga (70.4), Mahoning (68.1), Trumbull (60.5), Summit (59.1) and Stark (53.0). Segregation for Northeast Ohio’s African-American population is moderate, however, for the region as a whole, at 51.3.

Dissimilarity Index for African Americans in Northeast Ohio

Residency of Northeast Ohio’s Latino and Hispanic Population

Hispanic and Latino Population

The Cleveland housing market has the highest concentration the Hispanic/Latino populations at 4.7%. Northeast Ohio’s Hispanic/ Latino residents are more dispersed in the region than its African-American residents, but reside in high concentrations in specific neighborhoods within the central cities and inner-ring suburbs.

Segregation

The Racial Dissimilarity Index compares areas by race based on a scale of 1 to 100, where perfect integration = 0 and complete segregation = 100. A score of 53 or more is considered a high level of segregation; areas with low levels of segregation score below 40.

Segregation for the Hispanic/ Latino population is low for the region as a whole, scoring 29.9 on the Racial Dissimilarity Index.

Dissimilarity Index for Latinos and Hispanics in Northeast Ohio

Racially Concentrated Areas of Poverty

Racially Concentrated Areas of Poverty

Race and Poverty

According to the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), a Racially Concentrated Area of Poverty is any census tract with a majority non-white population where either the family poverty rate is 40% or greater or the family poverty rate is at least three times that of the average family poverty rate for census tracts in that metropolitan area.

This map identifies racially concentrated areas of poverty in Northeast Ohio’s different housing markets.

Poverty in the African-American and Hispanic Communities in Cuyahoga County

Cuyahoga County Poverty

2 responses to While the region has made progress in addressing systemic issues of race, at the county level, the National Segregation Dissimilarity Index indicates that certain areas of Northeast Ohio remain highly segregated.

  1. There are two sides to the segregation coin. First to be considered is the historical and current patterns of segregation, both legal and non-legal. While much progress has been made in lowering the barriers to housing and education, significant obstacles still remain.

    The other side of the coin is ‘choice’. Can people choose to live in communities were they are not a minority member? If there were full integration of all minority populations, there would not be ‘Black, Chinese, Greek or any other type of minority neighborhoods.

    Simply looking at race or ethnic heritage is not enough to address the issue of segregation. The issue of how people make choices of where to live must be examined. How much is driven by factors of economics, class, employment, family, etc. must be part of the consideration.

  2. Great Points Lynn.

    My name is Jeff Anderle and I am the Manager of Communications and Engagement for the NEOSCC. Issues of choice and what affects those decisions are part of what we are trying to address.

    We are analyzing how patterns of land use, transportation, economic development and housing can offer different choices and access.

    Thanks for commenting!

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